Are you looking for a flowering tree to decorate your home? Look no further. Here are 20 trees with white flowers from which to choose.

Flowers are the best ornaments for gardens. And if you are preparing your garden to act as your cocoon, you would like to add calming, cool colors to it. White makes a good choice in this case.

White flowers will not only add a beautiful presence to your heaven but will also balance out other colors you would choose in trees.

And if these flowers are chosen for the only tree in your garden, you can be sure that this will neutralize the color contrast of other smaller flowering plants.

Here are 20 trees with white flowers that will make a perfect addition to any garden. But you have to choose them according to the environmental conditions you face and the zone you live in.

1. Crape Myrtle

Crape Myrtle
Source: pinterest.com

Crape Myrtle’s (Lagerstroemia Natchez) distinctive petals attract the onlookers. But it’s its blooming period that attracts the attention of gardeners.

We also term it as lilac of the South.

The plant blooms for up to 120 days in summer. Another beauty appears in their leaves which turn bright orange in the autumn.

Their blossom time is another fact that makes the plant desirable for many. These plants bloom later than other flowering trees – in late summer. Their period ranges from June to September.

You can also find other varieties of Crape Myrtle that give red flowers. This particular species, however, is a cross between two other species of the same plant – Japanese Crape Myrtle and common Crape Myrtle.
It’s a common choice because of its ability to be cultivated in many zones.

Because of its wide shade, gardeners use it in the middle of the garden or to line the driveway.

Here are the stats we must consider while buying the plant:

  • Bloom Time: June to September
  • Sun: Full
  • Height: 4 to 21 feet
  • Width: 4 to 20 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 6 to 9
Read More: 35 Beautiful DIY Plant Stand Ideas Is A Treat For You

2. Camellia japonica ‘White By The Gate’ (Camellia)

camellia japonica white tree
Source: thegrowingseason.wordpress.com

Just like the first flower in this article, Camellia (botanical name: Camellia japonica) blooms late in the autumn. Also, its blooming period is long and often lasts until spring. In short, the flower is best for making the beauty of your garden evergreen.

Its layered petals mark the beautiful presence it has in any garden. Other than vanilla-like white, its color range includes pink and red flowers. Flowers can be small – up to 2 inches in diameter – or large with a 5-inch diameter.

Before you decide to make this tree part of your garden, know that the plant demands attention especially when you grow it in places that are vulnerable to mold. They are best suited to warmer climates. Also, they are included in slow-growers and only grow up to 12 inches a year.

  • They live a long life. The oldest tree has an age of 500 years.
  • Bloom Time: November to April
  • Sun: Partial/ filtered
  • Height: 8 to 12 feet
  • Width: 6 to 10 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Moist
  • pH Preference: Slightly acidic
  • Zones: 7 to 9

3. Carolina Silverbell

Carolina Silverbell
Source: southernliving.com
carolina-silverbell-tree
Source: flickr.com

The Carolina Silverbell is biologically known as Halesia Carolina. It takes its prevalent name of silverbell from its flowering pattern which appears as tiny bells. But skip the anticipation, they are not silver – as the name suggests – but are pure white.

Different varieties of this plant come with flowers with varying petal sizes. Also, one variety offers blush petals.

They work great as a focal point for your patio design because of the uniqueness of their flowers, their foliage, and the combined look. If you wish you can keep it as a shrub in your landscaping project as well.

This understory deciduous tree is native to North Carolina Southeastern United States. Found naturally abundant, this tree is easy to care for and nurture. The two factors it needs include mild moisture and partial or full sun.

  • Bloom Time: April to May
  • Sun: Partial to full
  • Height: 30 to 40 feet
  • Width: 20 to 35 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 4 to 8

4. Serviceberry


Serviceberry carries the scientific name of Amelanchier Canadensis. Known with different names across regions, the tree attracted its name of service because its time of blossom coincided with the resuming time for church services in the Appalachian Mountains. Some other inclusions in the literature show that the name comes from the blooming period matching with Easter.

The small tree can be considered a shrub or a deciduous tree that can grow as tall as 40 feet in the wild. However, in domestic settings, it only reaches 30 feet in height at maturity.

Other than its white flowers, the tree declares a beautiful presence in different forms using its foliage colors that turn red or purple depending on the variety and its edible fruits which are blue or purple.

Because of its resistance to fungus, the tree is easy to cultivate.

  • Bloom Time: April to May
  • Sun: Full or partial shade
  • Height: 25 to 30 feet
  • Width: 15 to 20 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 4 to 8

5. Fringe Tree

Fringe-Tree
Source: flickr.com
Fringe-Tree
Source: flickr.com

Fringe Tree (botanical: Chionanthus virginicus) is known for its attractive creamy white flowers as well as its foliage that is gracefully long. The trees’ fruit lures birds towards them.

The plant’s ability to bloom in most zones makes it even more attractive to gardeners. Mostly, these trees make a great presence when planted at the lining of pathways. But you can also take them as specimen trees for your garden or patio.

Although the plant is dioecious, meaning it has female and male versions, it often shows both flowers in one tree.

The only drawback of planting these trees is the vulnerability they show towards emerald ash borers. You should plan for such an attack in advance if you have decided to bring fringe trees to your garden.

  • Bloom Time: May to June
  • Sun: Full or partial shade
  • Height: 10 to 20 feet
  • Width: 12 to 20 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 4 to 8
Read More: How to Create a Lush Balcony Garden

6. Japanese Tree Lilac

Japanese Tree Lilac
Source: Flickr.com
Japanese Tree Lilac
Source: Commom.wikimedia.com

When we think of lilacs, small flowers with four petals and a distinctive fragrance come to our mind. Japanese flowers are no different, only that they are larger than other lilac flowers. Also, these flowers are only white and do not have any purple hue in them.

The Japanese tree lilac (botanical: Syringa reticulata) is bigger than the common shrub lilac. During the small blooming period of up to two weeks, the flowers show their creamy white beauty.

You can either plant the tree as a specimen tree given its wide shade or choose to group a few to multiply the beauty.

  • Bloom Time: June
  • Sun: Full
  • Height: 20 to 30 feet
  • Width: 15 to 20 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Moist
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 3 to 7

7. Chokecherry

Source: moreleaf.org
_-Chokecherry
Source: freepik.com

Chokecherry (botanical: Prunus virginiana) is an understory tree that is often counted as a shrub because of its borderline size.

The tiny white flowers make its trademark plus an edible fruit that’s chokecherry. Before you set out to test the fruit, know that it contains a lethal poison – cyanide – and should only be consumed when mature and cooked.

Gardeners use it on the side of pathways. One decisive factor in the purchase decision is the care you must take to cultivate the tree. They can grow irregularly and should get proper maintenance.

  • Bloom Time: April to May
  • Sun: Full to partial shade
  • Height: 20 to 30 feet
  • Width: 15 to 20 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Dry to medium
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 2 to 7

8. Bigleaf Magnolia

Bigleaf Magnolia
Source: clemson.edu
Bigleaf-Magnolia
Source: flickr.com

Bigleaf Magnolia (botanical: Magnolia macrophylla) is named as such because of its long leaves. The flowers are also larger than most flowering trees.

It might not be the most favored choice for most gardeners because of these large leaves. Another reason for the lack of popularity of these plants is their lack of tolerance towards most pollutants.

Instead, these trees are a great choice for country houses and also for those who are ready to wait for years before enjoying the first blossom as the tree takes up to twelve years before producing flowers.

  • Bloom Time: May
  • Sun: Full to partial shade
  • Height: 30 to 40 feet
  • Width: 30 to 40 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 5 to 8

9. Japanese Snowball

japanese snowball tree
Source: wilsonbrosgardens.com
Japanese Snowball
Source: wilsonbrosgardens.com

Japanese snowballs (botanical: Styrax japonicus) are small trees that top at 15 feet. Because of their size, these plants are often grouped under shrubs. The tiny flowers blossom in clusters and make a joyful view for those looking from under the tree.

Its immature fruits are red and as summer approaches they turn black attracting wild birds who eat them. The foliage turns from green to yellow, red, or purple in fall.

A cool feature for most gardeners among these trees is the ease of growing them as they are fairly tolerant to pollutants or pests.

  • Bloom Time: May to June
  • Sun: Full to partial shade
  • Height: 20 to 30 feet
  • Width: 20 to 30 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium
  • pH Preference: Acidic
  • Zones: 5 to 9

10. Callery Pear

Callery-Pear
Source: bhg.com
Source: apnews.com

Scientifically known as Pyrus calleryana, this tree also attracts the name of Bradford pear. The flowers of this plant captivate the spectators; however, it doesn’t make a great choice among gardeners because of its aggressive growth pattern.

Some regions and zones have also termed the plant as invasive making them unsuitable to be planted in households.

Also, the plant is vulnerable to snow storms and shouldn’t be cultivated in areas prone to such storms.
But if you are not situated in those zones and still want to commit to the care for the plant’s growth, know that other than pruning, the plant doesn’t require much care.

  • Bloom Time: April
  • Sun: Full
  • Height: 30 to 50 feet
  • Width: 20 to 35 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Moist
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 5 to 9

11. Horse Chestnut

Horse chestnut (botanical: Aesculus hippocastanum) got its name because of its fruits which appear just like sweet chestnuts. However, these fruits are toxic and cannot be eaten raw.

Apart from their inedible but medicinally important fruits, the plant is loved by people because of its large flowers. Their primary color is white but they have a tinge of pink in them.

Whether you are looking for a specimen tree or your search is only for lining the pathway, this tree makes a suitable choice for both.

  • Bloom Time: May
  • Sun: Full to partial shade
  • Height: 50 to 75 feet
  • Width: 40 to 65 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 3 to 8
Read More: The 4-Season Lawn Care Calendar

12. Royal White Redbud

Royal White Redbud
Source: plantingtree.com
Source: plantingtree.com

Botanically known as Cercis canadensis f. alba, this plant with royal white flowers does not occur naturally much. But you would find it in parks and gardens where the gardeners take time to graft it among the common redbud rootstock.

The flowers are large and have a pea-like appearance.

Another ornamental specialty of the tree is its foliage. The leaves are heart-shaped and they turn buttery yellow in the fall.

The tree is small and is often counted as a shrub because of its size.

  • Bloom Time: April
  • Sun: Full to slight shade
  • Height: 15 to 25 feet
  • Width: 15 to 25 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium to moist
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 4 to 9

13. Sweet Tea

Gordlinia grandiflora
Source: nurcar.com
nurcar.com
Source: finegardening.com

This small tree is botanically known as Gordlinia grandiflora. Developed in 2003, this tree also attracted the name of Mountain Gordlinia.

It is a cross between Franklin tree and Loblolly Bay. It is a semi-evergreen plant that sheds some of its leaves in autumn and sustains others in the fall colors of red-orange. But it’s flowers that entice the audience.

The large flowers are fragrant and showy. They appear in late summer and persist for quite some time. Gardeners use these plants to line the driveways or these can also decorate a small garden as a specimen tree.

  • Bloom Time: July to September
  • Sun: Full to partial shade
  • Height: 20 to 30 feet
  • Width: 8 to 15 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium to moist
  • pH Preference: Slightly acidic
  • Zones: 7 to 9

14. White Snow Fountains® Weeping Cherry Tree

Weeping Cherry Tree
Source: toadstoolseeds.com
Cherry-Tree
Source: homequestionsanswered.com

These cascading trees have a botanical name – Prunus x ‘Snofozam’ White. They are beloved by homeowners and gardeners because of their ornamental nature as well as their fragrance. The early spring blossom of the tree coincides with most other plants’ flowering cycles.

Apart from their flowers, the trees also attract attention because of the leaves which turn from green to yellow to orange and then red.

Also, gardeners find it adaptable to most zones and environments making the tree a highly desirable choice among landscaping projects.

  • Bloom Time: April
  • Sun: Full
  • Height: 8 to 15 feet
  • Width: 8 to 10 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Moist
  • pH Preference: Slightly acidic
  • Zones: 5 to 9

15. Panicle Hydrangea ‘Limelight’

Panicle Hydrangea
Source: thespruce.com

This plant attracts attention because of its ability to survive in most zones.

But that’s not all!

The tree has different types with varying colors and its stem structure. Limelight makes one of these types which are most suitable for the tree-like appearance we expect from our trees with white flowers.

Scientifically known as Hydrangea paniculata, has other names including hardy hydrangea and peegee hydrangea.

You can grow limelight hydrangea to reach a height of 16 feet only with the right pruning. Because of their regular shape and predictable appearance, they suit formal gardens’ decorations.

  • Bloom Time: July to September
  • Sun: Full to part shade
  • Height: 6 to 15 feet
  • Width: 6 to 8 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 3 to 8

16. Kousa Dogwood

Source: thetreecenter.com

Kousa dogwood (Cornus kousa) comes from the dogwood family which is known for its delicacy and beauty. But this particular species earns its respect among gardeners because of its ease of cultivation.
Its ornamental show in summer and its color-changing foliage comes together to make it an eye-candy in gardens. The star-like flowers are one- to two-inch large and they keep blooming for some weeks before wilting.

Also, the flower is known to fill the whole canopy instead of creating clusters here and there.
Among all dogwood types, this one is the hardiest and fairly disease-resistant.

  • Bloom Time: May to June
  • Sun: Full to part shade
  • Height: 15 to 30 feet
  • Width: 15 to 30 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Moist
  • pH Preference: Slightly acidic
  • Zones: 5 to 8

17. White Rose of Sharon

White Rose of Sharon
Source: commons.wikimedia.org

We include the word white in the name of white rose Sharon because unlike other varieties of Sharon roses, this variety only has a single color and lacks a different hue in the middle part known as the throat of the flower. The botanical name of the plant is Hibiscus syriacus ‘Notwoodtwo’.

These plants are smaller than regular trees and can be counted as larger shrubs.

The multi-stem plant is suitable for those purists who want to stick to white in their tree collection. Most gardeners use these plants to line the garden. However, before buying it for your landscaping project, make sure to consult plant atlas for your state to know if they are included in the invasive category or not.

  • Bloom Time: June to September
  • Sun: Full to part shade
  • Height: 5 to 8 feet
  • Width: 4 to 6 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Dry to moist
  • pH Preference: Slightly acidic
  • Zones: 5 to 8

18. Washington Hawthorn

Washington Hawthorn
Source: garden.lovetoknow.com

This plant with its unique beauty exhibits ornamental characteristics not only because of its flowers but also because of its stem structure, bright red fruit, and its foliage.

Botanists call it Crataegus phaenopyrum and they are indigenous to the Southeastern United States. While taller than shrubs, these trees are still counted among short trees.

These trees, however, require special care for nurturing and sustaining as they are not much resistant to insect attacks just like the other hawthorn plants. But gardeners can prevent the attacks by ensuring proper health of the tree and taking proactive measures.

  • Bloom Time: May to June
  • Sun: Full
  • Height: 25 to 30 feet
  • Width: 25 to 30 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Neutral
  • pH Preference: Acidic to neutral
  • Zones: 3 to 8

19. Flowering Crabapple

Flowering Crabapple
Source: homeguides.sfgate.com

Although most trees of this type bear dark pink to red flowers, you will also find a few varieties with white flowers. This vase-shaped, deciduous plant is known botanically as Malus ‘Sutyzam’ SUGAR TYME.

The white petals combine with deep yellow color at the flower throat to enhance the beauty.

Although the blooming period of these flowers only lasts a few weeks, the tree maintains its ornamental value all-round the year. Other elements of decoration that come with the plant include its color-changing foliage and the fruits that attract birds throughout the winter.

The value of this tree with white flowers is further enhanced by its hardiness. It’s suitable for most zones and is fairly resistant to insects and diseases.

  • Bloom Time: April
  • Sun: Full
  • Height: 14 to 18 feet
  • Width: 10 to 15 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium moisture
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 4 to 8

20. California Buckeye

California Buckeye
Source: gardeninthehills.wordpress.com

California buckeye makes abundant species in the hilly areas or valleys or Central California. During its blossom, the plant exhibits clusters of flowers with each cone-like cluster having up to 80 individual flowers.

It produces inedible chestnut-like nuts. Know that most parts of the tree are toxic. These include the fruit, leaves, and stem or bark. Unlike most other plants, these have a life cycle that prompts them to shed leaves in summer and get them back in autumn or winter.

The flowers are not only attractive to humans but also garner the attention of birds and other insects.
Another attraction that may prompt you to give this tree a go at your garden is its long life. These trees can live up to 300 years.

  • Bloom Time: February to March
  • Sun: Full or partly shade
  • Height: 15 to 30 feet
  • Width: 15 to 30 feet
  • Soil Moisture: Medium moisture
  • pH Preference: Neutral
  • Zones: 7 to 8

Take Away

If you are looking for an adequate flowering tree for your garden and patio, you should consider those plants which match your zone, the soil you have gotten, the level of care you can impart, and, of course, the ornamental detail you want in them.

So, if your choice is getting trees with white flowers for your plant, this article shows 20 of such trees. Most of the trees in this list are larger trees with a mature height ranging between 30 and 40 feet. But some are smaller, making great understory trees.

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